History

History


For nearly 140 years, the Union League Club of Chicago has upheld the sacred obligations of citizenship, promoted honesty and efficiency in government, supported cultural institutions and the beautification of the city and supported our nation’s military and their families.


Through the efforts of its dynamic membership, the Club has been a catalyst for action in nonpartisan political, economic and social arenas – focusing its leadership and resources on important social issues. As early as 1893, Chicago gained recognition as a world-class city when it hosted the World’s Columbian Exposition. Club Members were instrumental in having Chicago named as the site of the exposition by the United States Congress. Since that time Club Members have played a role in establishing many of the city’s cultural organizations, including Orchestra Hall and the Field Museum. In the 1990s, the Club celebrated its role in the opening of the Harold Washington Library Center.

Today, the Club continues its pursuit to remain committed to community, country and culture.
COMMUNITY
Many things can be said about the Club’s involvement in the community. From the work done by the Public Affairs Committee, to members’ backing of the Club’s three foundations, to the Art Committee’s support of local artists; the Club makes every effort to improve the present while laying the groundwork for a successful future.

COUNTRY
The Club has never wavered in its support of the men and women who serve our country. This support comes from our own Chicago 502, which supports the soldiers and families of the Army’s 502nd Infantry Regiment/101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), our 721 Club, which supports the crew and families of the USS Chicago (SSN 721), a U.S. Navy submarine and our American Legion Post #758, which supports U.S. veterans and their families.

CULTURE
The Club’s original principle to support cultural institutions and the beautification of the city has not only continued, but flourished. The ULCC not only supports cultural institutions, but has become one in its own right. With nearly 800 pieces of artwork, the Club was named by the Chicago Tribune “The Other Art Institute of Chicago.” After renovating the Rendezvous and Wigwam, updating menus and upgrading service, the Club can also claim some of the best food and dining experiences Chicago has to offer, as evident from the 2015 DiRoNA award.
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